National Computational Infrastructure

NCI

Monthly Archives: May 2016

  • New software installed - May 2016

    New software installed – May 2016

    May 2016 amber/16-16.05 boost/1.60.0 cube/4.3.4 gflags/2.1.2 glog/0.3.4 hdf5/1.10.0 intel-advisor/2016.1.30.450722 intel-advisor/2016.1.40.463413 intel-cc/16.0.3.210 intel-fc/16.0.3.210 intel-inspector/2016.1.2.450824 intel-inspector/2016.1.3.460803 intel-ipp/16.0.3.210 intel-mkl/16.0.3.210 intel-mpi/5.1.3.210 intel-tbb/16.0.3.210 intel-vtune/2016.2.0.444464 intel-vtune/2016.3.0.463186 leveldb/1.18 lmdb/0.9.18 lsdyna/R7.0.0 opari2/2.0 openmpi/cuda/7.5/1.10.2 openmpi/cuda/7.5/1.10.2-debug openmpi/cuda/7.5/1.10.2-mt openmpi/cuda/7.5/1.10.2-mt-debug otf2/2.0 protobuf/2.6.1 scalasca/2.3 scorep/2.0.1 snappy/1.1.3 tensorflow/0.8 module avail on Raijin to see more information.

  • GPU nodes now online

    GPU nodes now online

    The recent installation of 14 new GPU nodes on the Raijin supercomputer will offer significant performance increases for users running GPU-optimised code. Chemistry, molecular dynamics and bioinformatics projects who have already transitioned to the GPU's have experienced faster results and increased efficiency. This upgrade gives NCI an additional 163 Tflops, an overall 14% performance boost. Each compute node includes four NVIDIA Tesla K80 GPU Accelerators, supplemented by two sockets of 12-core Intel Haswell E5-2670v3 running at 2.3GHz and 256GB DDR4 system memory. In addition, each K80 houses ... Read More

  • NCI congratulates new Academy of Science Fellows

    NCI congratulates new Academy of Science Fellows

    Two users of NCI have been announced as new Fellows of the Australian Academy of Science. Professors Susan Scott and Simon Foote, both from The Australian National University, have been recognised for ground breaking scientific work during their careers. Professor Susan Scott work focuses on gravitational waves and general relativity, and is a member of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration that recently announced the first direct measurement of a gravitational wave. This work has involved understanding background noise at a variety of detectors, ... Read More

  • Optics breakthrough to revamp night vision

    Optics breakthrough to revamp night vision

      A breakthrough by an Australian collaboration of researchers could make infra-red technology easy-to-use and cheap, potentially saving millions of dollars in defence and other areas using sensing devices, and boosting applications of technology to a host of new areas, such as agriculture. Infra-red devices are used for improved vision through fog and for night vision and for observations not possible with visible light; high-quality detectors cost approximately $100,000 (including the device at the University of Sydney) some require cooling to -200°C. Now, ... Read More

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