National Computational Infrastructure

NCI

Monthly Archives: May 2015

  • Newly elected AAS Fellows

    Newly elected AAS Fellows

    Congratulations to the four NCI-supported researchers who have been announced as Fellows of the Australian Academy of Science.Professors Martin Asplund and Malcolm Sambridge from ANU, Maria Forsyth from Deakin University, and Julian Gale from Curtin University were among the 21 new Fellows announced for 2015.              Astronomer Professor Martin Asplund, who was recognised for his work on the life and death of stars, said the honour was humbling.“It’s a humbling experience – I never thought I would get to this point so ... Read More

  • Solving corrosive ocean mystery reveals our future climate

    Solving corrosive ocean mystery reveals our future climate

    Around 55 million years ago, an abrupt global warming event triggered a highly corrosive deep-water current to flow through the North Atlantic Ocean.  The current's origin puzzled scientists for a decade, but with the help of NCI’s supercomputer, an international team of researchers has now discovered how it formed. The findings, published in Nature Geoscience, 12 May, may have implications for the carbon dioxide emission sensitivity of today's climate.The researchers explored the acidification of the ocean that occurred during a period known ... Read More

  • Origins and future of Lake Eyre and the Murray-Darling Basin

    Origins and future of Lake Eyre and the Murray-Darling Basin

    Geoscientists have, for the first time, discovered the origins of Australia’s two largest basins: Lake Eyre and the Murray-Darling Basin. The research also implies that in 30 million years’ time both basins will cease to exist.Monash University geoscientist Associate Professor Wouter Schellart, and his colleague Professor Wim Spakman from Utrecht University, have discovered how the floor of an entire ocean basin that was destroyed 70 to 50 million years ago off the North coast of New Guinea is currently located at 800-1200km depth below Central ... Read More

  • England set for substantial increase in record-breaking warm years

    England set for substantial increase in record-breaking warm years

    Media releaseThe likelihood of record-breaking warm years in England is set to substantially increase as a result of the human influence on the climate, new research suggests.In a study published today, 1 May, in IOP Publishing’s journal Environmental Research Letters, an international team of researchers has shown that the chances of England experiencing a record-breaking warm year, such as the one seen in 2014, is at least 13 times more likely as a result of anthropogenic climate change.This is according ... Read More

In Collaboration With